Coping with Endometriosis Pain

If you have endometriosis, or overgrowth of your uterine lining, you may experience uncomfortable symptoms, such as pelvic pain, painful intercourse, and severe menstrual cramping. These symptoms can range from mildly annoying to life-disrupting.

At Abundant Life Healthcare, we can help you find pain relief. Endometriosis can’t be cured, but the condition can be managed. Even if you’ve had laparoscopic surgery to remove endometrial tissue, residual pain can remain. And, endometriosis can return.

Every woman’s experience with endometriosis is different, and so is her pain experience. Follow these tips to find ideas as to how you can ease pain each and every day.

Use heat therapy

A heating pad can help ease and soothe cramping, especially around your period. Modern versions are wireless and super convenient. An old-fashioned water bottle also works well.

Taking a warm bath can also help ease your muscles.

Follow a healthy lifestyle

Keep yourself hydrated, quit smoking, avoid excessive alcohol intake, and eat a healthy diet full of nutritious foods, especially colorful fruits and vegetables containing a plethora of antioxidants to help ease inflammation.  A healthy lifestyle goes a long way in keeping your body feeling strong and resilient to pain.

Try over-the-counter pain relievers

Over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen can help reduce mild-to-moderate endometriosis pain, especially around the time of your period. Talk to Dr. Jean-Gilles about appropriate dosing and frequency.

Obtain a TENS machine

A Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) unit stimulates the nerves and alters the way your body receives pain signals. Over-the-counter versions are available in most drugstores. You attach an electrode pad to areas of pain, and it sends quick bursts of electric currents to affect pain centers. You feel tingling and vibrations that help to ease your pain.

Take care of yourself

Endometriosis pain can make it hard to do your job and to take care of your family. This stress can spiral, making your pain more overwhelming. Be mindful and schedule time for yourself, so you feel more in control of your life. Yoga, deep breathing, and massage are options for stress-reduction treatment.

Hormone therapy

Dr. Jean-Gilles may recommend hormone therapy to help you manage endometriosis pain. Endometrial pain can be triggered by the rise and fall of hormones during your menstrual cycle. Birth control pills can help moderate these hormones, so your symptoms ease. With birth control, you may have a lighter and shorter flow each month, too.

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and antagonists are another option. They put you into temporary menopause by lowering your estrogen levels, which slows the growth of endometrial tissue and can even cause it to shrink.

Progestin therapy delivered orally or via injection can stop your period and prevent the growth of additional endometrial tissue, easing your symptoms.

If none of these home remedies or conservative therapies help, or if endometriosis is interfering with your ability to get pregnant, you may require a surgical intervention. Dr. Jean-Gilles uses laparoscopic surgery, which is done with a small camera and mini tools through small incisions, to remove endometrial tissue whenever possible. His goal is to leave your reproductive organs intact. If, however, you’re sure you don’t want to become pregnant, a hysterectomy eliminates your problems with endometriosis.

If you’re suffering pain that you believe to be associated with endometriosis, seek the expert care available at Abundant Life Healthcare. Call today, or book an appointment online to develop a care plan that relieves your pain and helps you meet your health goals. 

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